“Dedicated to providing gentle, compassionate care for companion animals”

 
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Zander-and-Pumpkin-Haler

Some of you may remember Zander, the cat that was a stray brought to us with a total urinary blockage. Dr. Elliott stayed late into the night to get Zander unblocked and on the road to recovery. He stayed with us for almost a month, running the clinic and supervising the doctors. He stole all of our hearts and we are so happy to see him happily in his new home, 1 year later with wonderful owners who make sure to keep us updated on this wonderful boy.

We are so blessed that the Animal Wellness Center decided to operate on Zander and take him in to recuperate. We had just lost our sweet girl Marina after having her for nearly 18 years and were broken hearted. Just a couple of weeks later we saw the post about Zander and how he needed a home that would be able to make sure he had the appropriate medical care and feed him prescription cat food. When we saw him and realized it was the same food that Pumpkin had to get, we knew he was meant for us. We met him and brought him home and it was a battle from the first day, but we knew we would not give up on them getting along. Now the two of them tag team mom and dad waking us up to feed them, sometimes share a chair together and actually miss each other after time apart.

Pumpkin was also a rescue kitty. Nathan and I were recently married and visiting my parents in northern Wisconsin when their neighbor called. The neighbor went on to say that this little cat had followed their dog home from out in the woods. They are allergic to cats (so are we) so we said we would come get him. He was only about 4-5 weeks old and super dirty. He slept the entire night between my ear and shoulder, purring. He grew up with his "cousin", my sister's English toy spaniel, on 2 occasions getting concussions from "rough-housing". Neither one of us would have ever thought we were cat people, but these two boys are full of personality and love. Thank you for taking such great care of them.

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Cassie-Steffen

Cassie is a 10 year old Golden Retriever. We purchased Cassie from a local pet store. She was the last pup, and was so sweet we just had to bring her home. Cassie's favorite things include her adopted sister Mollie, swimming in the lake, and rolling in the dirt; especially after a bath. She also loves her Grandpa who will come over and let her out on days I am out and about. He has learned to hide his gloves as they will disappear as soon as they are put down.

My favorite story about Cassie is how she loves to over take any floatation device, whether it is being used by a human or not. She now has her very own. When Cassie was a pup was diagnosed with a heart murmur which was detected after we got her. She has had surgery to remove a bottle cap that she swallowed and was treated for chronic pain in her back leg joint. This resulted in the removal of this leg; pathology later determined there was cancer. She was recently diagnosed with a heart arrhythmia and is on medication to control it. She loves coming to AWC and knows the routine; she will not pass the front desk without getting weighed. She is our Miracle Dog and has been through a lot.

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Tabitha-and-Tiger-Lily

Tiger Lily came from a hoarding situation where she was one of 30 cats and kittens in a single home.

I first saw Tiger Lily at the Petsmart in Maple Grove in the late fall of 2013. Tiger Lily was in the left corner of the shelf cages. She was so pretty! She somehow planted herself in my heart and I started to think about, my gut was telling me that she was the cat for me. I went back, a few weeks later to see if she was still there, but she was gone, most likely adopted by someone. I was so disappointed. A month later before Christmas, I went back to consider finding a different cat to adopt, however I was very surprised to see Tiger Lily was back at the adoption center! I was so happy to see her, I told the lady from the adoption center “I want to adopt Tiger Lily – don’t let her go!” She seemed surprised that Tiger Lily was finally finding a good home and posted a “pending” sign to hold her for me. Tiger Lily finally came home on January 5, 2014! She was hiding and shy for less than 2 weeks, then she finally became a happy girl, living in her forever home!

Tiger Lily loves to climb on her cat tree and watch out the window to see the birds going by or the cars on Hwy 494. She loves to play tag with her sister Tabitha and also loves to play with her toys, especially the feathers on a stick. She enjoys staying at the AWC Resort with her sister when I am out of town.

Tiger Lily and I have coffee together every morning. She used to watch me like she wanted to join me in my morning coffee, so I got a mug and filled it with water and put it down on the table for her. She started drinking it out of the mug! If I forget to bring her the water in the coffee cup in the morning, she looks very serious! We have our “coffee” together every morning.

Tiger Lily does seem a little afraid when she goes to see her doctor, but the receptionists cover her carrier with a blanket that has a calming pheromone on it and her doctor is so good to her and care about keeping her trust. Tiger also sees Abby for grooming, she loves feeling clean and it helps reduce her shedding. I am so grateful to Abby for communicating to me in American Sign Language to let me know how she did for her bath.

Tabitha’s former owner dumped her at the door of a staff member who works at Gregory’s Hope at the Humane Society in New Richmond, WI when she was a tiny kitten. Tabitha survived the cool night outside and the staff found her the next morning, all the staff members nursed her back to health.

I was visiting my best friend in New Richmond, WI and we went to the humane society to look at the cats and kittens. We saw Tabitha, 3 months old and very active and playful, and we picked her because we thought she would be a good playmate for Tiger Lily. I adopted her in October of 2015 and brought her home to Tiger Lily for her birthday. They connected at once and have been best friends ever since.

Tabitha is very playful and loves her toys, especially the feathers on a stick. She loves playing with Tiger Lily and is very affectionate towards me, even licking my face like a dog! She also loves relaxing in her carrier in the car on long trips.

Tabitha gets very excited to go see Dr. Moyer, when I open her carrier and tell her it’s time to go see Dr. Moyer, she goes right in. She loves to play with the feather toy in the room while we wait for Dr. Moyer. When Tabitha was having issues breathing, Dr. Moyer found a cyst in her throat that was causing her issues. Dr. Moyer removed it and now Tabitha is breathing normally. I am so grateful to Dr. Moyer for communicating with me in American Sign Language to help me understand Tiger Lily and Tabitha’s health issues and how to properly care for them.



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Dog-of-the-Month-Teddy

In early November 2004, we had just lost our second Basset Beau, after a long battle with Cushing’s disease and we were not ready to even think about getting another dog. But on the night we put Beau down, we saw the Northern lights in the sky and both my wife and I heard a bell ringing. We couldn’t help thinking of the line from the movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” about hearing a bell every time an angel gets his wings. The next day, still trying to forget our sadness, we went to the theater to see the new movie “Polar Express”. The theme song from that movie was called “Believe” and had lyrics that talked about dreams that are calling like bells in the distance and encouraging us to believe in what your heart is saying. Well it seemed like fate was pushing us towards something, so we called the breeder where we got Beau and were surprised to find out that she had a couple of Basset puppies available in a new litter after having taken a break for several years. We went to see her and fell in love with one of the puppies, but she wasn’t sure which one she wanted to keep as her new show dog. Luckily she picked the other puppy and we were able to take home our new Teddy for Thanksgiving just two weeks after losing Beau. We’ve been thankful ever since and we just have to believe in fate after that experience.

Teddy has always been a lover with lots of personality and he loves to tell you all about it (woof woof). Teddy is a purebred Basset Hound, he is tri color and about 11 ½ years old. Teddy has one favorite toy, a big stuffed strawberry (his woobie), that he’s had since he was a puppy and that we’ve had to re-stuff and stitch up several times. All dogs like to run off with some item of clothing and with Teddy, it’s socks – he waits every time we get changed to snatch one of our dirty socks and run off so we’ll chase him. Of course Teddy loves other dogs, people, FOOD, going to the dog park and AWC.

Our favorite story about Teddy would have to be the story about how we came to get him in the first place. Teddy is Basset number 3 in our lives and has turned out to be more loving and full of personality than we would have ever believed possible, but our miracle dog Teddy has taught us to always keep believing.

Teddy has been going to AWC since day one and it’s literally one of Teddy’s favorite things to do. Teddy even took his first puppy socialization class at AWC where he loved to play with a Great Dane. Of course he knows where we are going when we turn on to East Fish Lake Road and Teddy starts barking with excitement long before we turn into the parking lot. And he does it every single time, whether we’re coming in to be poked and prodded or for a fun day at doggie day care. He loves seeing everyone at AWC, especially his friend Janet who spoils him with treats every time he comes in. Besides all the love and care he gets at AWC we also have had a couple of rough spots over the years when we thought we were going to lose him, but the excellent care he receives got Teddy back to his old self again. 



























Teddy has been going to AWC since day one and it’s literally one of Teddy’s favorite things to do. Teddy even took his first puppy socialization class at AWC where he loved to play with a Great Dane. Of course he knows where we are going when we turn on to East Fish Lake Road and Teddy starts barking with excitement long before we turn into the parking lot. And he does it every single time, whether we’re coming in to be poked and prodded or for a fun day at doggie day care. He loves seeing everyone at AWC, especially his friend Janet who spoils him with treats every time he comes in. Besides all the love and care he gets at AWC we also have had a couple of rough spots over the years when we thought we were going to lose him, but the excellent care he receives got Teddy back to his old self again. 

 
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It’s that time of year again! The days are long, the grills are fired up, and corn on the cob is in season. Unfortunately, many dog owners do not know that corn cobs are actually EXTREMELY dangerous for their pets to ingest. 

Corn cobs seem innocent enough, right? They are all-natural, they LOOK like a chew toy, and dogs often relish the offer of a cob from the picnic table.

However, corn cobs break apart easily when chewed and can be swallowed in large chunks. Since they are hard to digest, the cobs often pass out of the stomach into the intestines intact.  These chunks, made of a tough core and covered in rough kernel hulls, are the perfect shape and texture to cause an intestinal obstruction.  Even more worrisome is the risk of intestinal perforation as the tissues struggle to move the indigestible cob.

Signs of intestinal obstruction can include vomiting, abdominal pain, lethargy, weakness, and appetite loss.  If you suspect your dog has consumed corn cobs (or any other foreign body), please call us immediately and come to the clinic (if it is overnight or after-hours, please proceed straight to an emergency clinic).

It is very important to try and remove the cob before it causes an obstruction. It is also urgent to remove the cob surgically if it is causing an obstruction, before it causes an intestinal perforation and life-threatening infection called septic peritonitis.

preview-full-Corn-Cobs-Are-Dangerous575-blog-post

You can spot the corn cob in the above radiograph (red arrow). It is still in this dog’s stomach and shows the classic “honeycomb” texture associated with the kernel hulls. This corn cob was successfully removed before it passed into the intestines.

Dogs can be sneaky when they spot an unattended corn cob on the counter, or smell them in the trash. They can also ingest other dangerous objects often present in the summer such as peach pits, pinecones, or discarded bones from a barbecue. When you have finished enjoying your ear of corn or rack of ribs, please discard of the leftovers in a sealed garbage container that is inaccessible to your pet. 

As always, do not hesitate to give us a call if you have any questions about your pet’s health and safety. Wishing you and your dog a safe and joyful summer!

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